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The next generation of editing talent, Homespun’s Assistant Editors on their part in Yarns 2016

20 December 2016

If you haven’t heard about Homespun Yarns 2016 where have you been? This year the competition was the biggest ever, the editing collective partnered with Wave Music and invited filmmakers to submit their ideas for a short film inspired by Lyves’ haunting alternative electro soul track, ‘Darkest Hour’.

Image TitleHOMESPUN

With a record number of entries for the competition, four directors were shortlisted for funding – one more than the competition usually recognises. When it came down to the vote, it was Thomas Ralph’s powerfully current film on Britain’s youth generation that won the hearts of the Homespun Yarns voting audience.

We’ve spoken about the winning films, the directors and of course the party but who edited this year’s films? The Homespun Yarns competition is fundamentally about nurturing emerging talent, covering all aspects of the film making process so here’s what three of the editors experienced during the course of this year’s project.

Jennifer Tividad, Editor, UNDDRCVJRR LOVYYUURS, Dir. Jonathan Augustavo

Image TitleJennifer Tividad

How did you feel when you were asked to edit JJ’s film?
This year was the first time I'd cut anything for Homespun so that prospect was a little terrifying and exciting in itself! But having seen JJ's work & UL being one of my stand out favourites of the shortlisted ideas so I was really pleased.

Was there anything about his idea that you felt attracted to when you initially read the treatment?
JJ had used the Darkest Hour lyrics in a quirky way to create this unique ghost love story. The ghosts were written as two people running around in white sheets with eyes cut out - instead of potentially falling flat it worked really well with the story - on paper & on film! The script was sweet, funny & weird- I knew it would be really fun, I'm a big fan of off beat things.

Is this the first short you have fully edited? If not what else have you worked on?
Yes this was my first ever short film, previously I'd only worked on a number of music related type promos.

This was a remote edit as JJ was in LA. What was the biggest challenge in working this way?
The biggest challenge here was riding the big time difference between us. We were both quite busy as well so there were times it could take two days for each of us to respond to each other, this cut down the delivery time a little!

What did you learn from this?
Just enjoy the madness, as is the case with most creative projects with tight turn arounds! Creatively, it was a new great challenge for me never having done a short film but it was fun interpreting the script & working with JJ. We met for the first time at the screening - it was a little strange having worked hard on something with someone I'd never met or spoken to but he was very cool & appreciative of everything that had been put into it. On another note, it was really cool to see how supportive everyone was, at work & all the post folks doing as much as they could to make the film as great as it could be. The guys at Wave, Freefolk + Mad Ruffiian were talented & so helpful in potentially stressful times, I'm really thankful!

Is the final film as you envisaged?
I'm so proud of the film & what we achieved. It was well casted & JJ shot it so beautifully in LA, he was really careful to capture & convey the emotions of these characters throughout the process. I was so fortunate to work with so much great material & talent, hopefully we'll get to work together again.

Anything else you’d like to add?
It'd be great for there to be more competitions like HS Yarns out there which create opportunities for young talent to connect with each other to create films that might not otherwise happen. It was such a great experience and at the screening it was a great chance to meet so many other people who share and support Homespun's creative vibe & goals.

Richard Woolway – Editor, Darkest Hour, dir. Lee Thomas

Image TitleRichard Woolway

How did you feel when you were asked to edit Lee's film? Was there anything about his idea that you felt attracted to when you initially read the script?
From the outset, Lee’s was a script that stood out for me. He wasn’t trying to do anything flashy, I loved that about it…Just straight up story telling.

How did how this compare to what you have worked on before?
It was great to be involved from the ground up with a project. To see it come to life over the period of production, from script revisions, to storyboarding, casting, to the shoot. It was great to see Lee bring his vision to reality.

What was the working relationship like between you and Lee?
There aren’t enough positive words i can say about Lee. The man is a total legend. So yeah, it was alright working with him.

What was the biggest challenge of the process?
It’s always tricky working on jobs with such a low budget. But Lee had the cleverness and knowing to make all of the challenges we faced work to our advantage. Perhaps this is the rose tint of hindsight, but really it was a dream project. Lee might tell you different however.

What did you learn from this?
Not so much learning, as the reinforcement of existing knowledge. Anything is possible given the right opportunity.

Is the final film as you envisaged?
It’s way better!

Anything else you’d like to add?
Thanks to everyone I work with at Homespun, everyone works so hard to make this competition possible, but this year was a extra massive effort, people dug DEEP. Nobody has to do any of this, its all for the love, its all for the creative and above everything its all for the people.And Lee Thomas is a genius and a gentleman.

Ben Corfield (Work) – Editor, Bliss, Dir. Thomas James

Image TitleBen Corfield

How did you feel when you were asked to edit the Yarns film? Was there anything about his idea that you felt attracted to when you initially read the script?

The script was so good I was praying I could clear some space to do it. It's inherently dark and the tragedy leapt off the pages as I read it. It was a pretty harrowing read but absolutely compelling.

How did how this compare to what you have worked on before?

It's a different discipline to your usual 30-60 seconds - and with less time to cut it. But longform gives you the opportunity to fully develop mood, tension and conflict. Strong performances are always a pleasure to edit

What was the working relationship like between you and Thomas?

First of all, Thomas would make a great nurse. I was quite ill over the first couple of days and he makes a mean health juice! Having worked together a few years ago, it was a privilege to work with him again. We both share some fundamental ideas and collaborating with each other to bring his vision to life was hugely rewarding.

What was the biggest challenge of the process?

Its always time. There's never enough. I think from Thomas' first shoot day to having the edit locked was about a week, which gave us roughly 3 very long days of editing. But who needs sleep?

What did you learn from this?

Sleep is a pretty useful thing to have. And only eating Chinese takeaway for three days in a row was a first.

Is the final film as you envisaged?

Better

Anything else you’d like to add?

I wouldn't recommend eating Chinese takeaway for 3 days.

Contact Name
Alice Clarke
Email
alice@stitchediting.tv
Phone
02030565000